Wednesday, 30 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: Z

Hello Everyone,

Today’s the last day of the A to Z Challenge which is sad as I’ve enjoyed writing about all the different books, and knowing what I am going to write about every-day. It’s a little daunting, having to try and think about other things to write about, so today’s book is perfect for this. It is a collection of essays called Zen in the art of writing by Ray Bradbury on the love of writing. They try to inspire writers to write, and give creative ideas about what to write.
via: http://thespeakinghusky.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Ray-Bradbury-Zen-in-the-Art-of-Writing.jpg


The main points of the essays are:

  • Write about something that excites you. If you are not excited about it, then your writing will only be half as good.
  • Watch the world around you, that’s where the best inspiration will come from. A phrase said, or an out of place sign, they can all lead to inspiration.
  • Read. Keep reading lots of different things, and this will keep you inspiration alive. Your writing will also get better and easier if you read more.
  • Don’t doubt yourself. If you don’t believe in your work, then no one else will.
  • Do writing exercises, like word association or write a few lines about a certain subject. This will just make writing so much easier.
  • Editing is fantastic. It is much easier now that we’ve got word programs to help us. Your writing will get much better when you edit. And it is always easier to cut down than flesh out.

How do you think about what to write? Where does your inspiration come from? Your life? World events? A review of something you’ve used? Let me know by commenting below.

Gracexxx


Tuesday, 29 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: Y

Hello Everyone,


Today’s book is not a book, it is a poem by Robert Burns. I don’t like poetry as a rule, I don’t mind reading it, but that is all (apart from Shakespeare, who has a special place in my heart), I am not keen on studying it and writing about it. However, there is a slight moment of pride when I read a Robert Burns poem. I just love the way it sounds when someone Scottish reads it out, almost strengthening their accent when speaking. There is something to it that sounds so natural and beautiful that I just sort of melt inside. The subject matter of love doesn’t help either, clearly Burns (or the speaker) was just so suave and smooth with the opposite sex that the words seemed to come so easy to him. I just love them.

Ye Banks and Braes O’Bonnie Doon is a Scottish lullaby about a woman singing to the river. She cannot believe that it is so beautiful, but so cruel at the same time. I don’t completely understand all of it, but I think you don’t always need to understand everything in a poem, some ambiguity is good. It allows you to interpret the poem in whatever way that you want. I really just love the way the poem sounds, it could be complete nonsense, but if it sounds nice then I will love it.

This poem can be sung, so I have included a link to a video of John Barrowman singing it, he does no' a bad job! (Ye Banks and Braes O'Bonnie Doon). As a result throughout the ages, this song has had many different versions. All three are lovely, but the one that is sang in the video is my favourite. Another person that does a good version is Eddie Reader here.

What is your favourite Burns song? Comment below telling me.


Gracexxx

Monday, 28 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: X

Hello Everyone,


Today’s letter is X, and this one was a tough one as you could have guessed. There aren’t many books beginning with X surprisingly, so when I found out that Edith Wharton, one of my favourite author’s had written something beginning with X, I just knew that I had to write something on it.
via: http://www.sfsu.edu/~sfsumag/archive/fall_winter_03/pix/wordplay.jpg


Xingu is about a group of ladies who meet up for a book group in order to be a pretentious as possible. One day, an author that all the ladies bar one, Mrs Roby, has read visits the book club. She proves to be one of the most pretentious and condescending woman the ladies have met, and makes all the other ladies feel small and stupid. However, the outcast of the group, Mrs Roby mentions the concept of Xingu, and all the other ladies pretend to know exactly what she is talking about, essentially making it up as they go along. The author is totally flummoxed, and begs to leave with Mrs Roby. The ladies, left to their own devices, start to argue amongst each other, still with no clue what they are talking about.
via: http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1347424217l/14992700.jpg


This just sounds hilarious, and something I totally get. Have you ever pretended to know about something that you don’t? I have (normally about arty films), more often than people would guess! It’s never nice to made to feel stupid, so being able to pick things up, and act like you know something is better than that.7


Gracexxx

Saturday, 26 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: W

Hello Everyone,


The letter is W, and the book is the Wonderful Wizard of Oz. I love everything ‘Ozian’ (including my friend who has recently moved there). For my eighteenth birthday I was given a copy of the Wonderful Wizard of Oz with a difference. Instead of Dorothy’s name in it, it was my name. It was specially ordered for me by my friend who has recently moved to Australia. When he gave it to me, i was chatting to him as I opened it, and when I saw what it was, my voice went up a couple of octaves, and I did a pretty girly scream of excitement. This is a completely unique gift, and I will keep it forever.
via: http://alien-blogger.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/wizard-of-oz-70.jpg

I had read the book before, and seen the movie, and seen most of the spin-off movies. I’ve also read the prequel Wicked, and the other books in that series, and I was Dorothy for Halloween a few years ago. I have seen the stage show of Wicked twice, and I am going to see it for a third time when it comes up to Glasgow in May. So you can say I am a bit of a fan. And this is the book that started it all.
via: http://sherman-theatre.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/wicked.jpg

It tells the story of a little girl called Dorothy who lives on a farm in Kansas with her uncle and her aunt. She has a little dog called Toto, and one day a tornado hits the farm. Dorothy falls and hits her head, and sees the house being pulled into the tornado and whisked away, leaving her uncle and aunt in cellar back in Kansas. When the house stops, Dorothy finds herself in the magical and of Oz. In order to get home, she is sent on a quest to find the Wizard, who can grant wishes, and lives in Oz. To do so, she must follow a road made of yellow bricks. As a reward for killing the Wicked Witch of the East (her house fell on her), she is given a pair of ruby red slippers. On her quest, she meets a Scarecrow who has no brains, a Tin Man who has no heart, and a Cowardly Lion with no courage. Together they travel to Oz, hindered by the Wicked Witch of the West, who wants revenge on Dorothy for killing her sister and taking her shoes. Will the characters ever get their wishes, will they meet the Wizard, and will Dorothy ever get home?
via: http://www.guisemagazine.com/assets/ruby.jpg

The story teaches children to be reliant on themselves, and that a slightly defiant streak will come in handy if you need it. They must have confidence and faith, and that there is always a way back home.


Gracexxx

Friday, 25 April 2014

A to Z Challenge: V

Hello Everyone,


It’s Friday, and that means it is Five on Friday (hosted by the fabulous girls AprilDarciChristina and Natasha), which is five times the books and five times the fun! The letter today is V, a Very Vicious Vocation of a letter that I am Vying to do!
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
This is a beautiful little picture book about, you guessed it, a very hungry caterpillar. He just eats and eats and eats. And then he curls up into a cocoon and sleeps for a long time. When he comes out, he is no longer a caterpillar, but a beautiful butterfly. I remember being read this as a little girl, and I in turn read it to my little sister. Children all across the world love it. A simple but very effective story. Did you get read it as a child, or did you read it to your own, or someone else’s children? What did you think of it?
via: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b5/HungryCaterpillar.JPG


           The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
This was possibly my favourite of the Narnia books, not funnily enough The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I can’t quite explain why, it just is. It might be because there is no actual villain to fight, it is the character’s flaws that cause the problems for the quest. I just loved the character of Eustace. I know this is not normal, he is presented as a horrible character, but he changes and learns the most from his time in Narnia, and I love things like that.
via: http://mauricebroaddus.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/The-Chronicles-of-Narnia-Voyage-of-the-Dawn-Treader.jpg

Venus and Adonis
This is a poem by Shakespeare about two lovers, Venus and Adonis. Adonis wants to go hunting, but Venus seduces him instead. It is later revealed that Adonis died in his hunting trip after his time with Venus. I absolutely adore Shakespeare, his words are just stunning. I especially love his poems and plays about love. I am a bit of a sap like that, and a bit of a romantic.
via: http://www.cems.ox.ac.uk/images/big/venus_adonis.jpg

Valentine Grey
This is a magnificent piece of work about human equality and the suffering people had to go through to get it. Valentine Grey stays in London with her cousin Reggie and his lover Frank. When the Boer War and conscription starts, Valentine takes her cousin’s place, so he can stay with Frank. However, both of them face persecution for their choices. The army is not a welcoming place for a woman, nor London for a homosexual.
via: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02347/valentine-grey-ill_2347175b.jpg

Vampire Diaries
I am not a fan of Vampire fiction, although I have read all the Twilight books. I just think that this genre is a bit overdone and out dated. However, I have heard that the Vampire Diaries is better than the Twilight saga (and they were written first), so I will be trying to check them out at some point.
via: http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20130904185820/vampirediaries/images/4/4a/The_Vampire_Diaries_Wiki-Background.png


Gracexxx

Thursday, 24 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: U

Hello Everyone,


The letter is U, and my book is Ulysses.

I have a love hate relationship with James Joyce. I was made to read and study the short story Clay, and I really hated the writing style, and the characters, and the story… but I loved studying it for some weird reason. I think I really like studying something that I have strong feelings on. I can’t write on something I have no opinion on, because it is just much easier to find things to write about on it.

I remember both my mum and my English teacher telling me about studying Ulysses. They both said that it was one of the worst things they had to do while at university. Both of them told me to never read it because it was so tough and dull.


Essentially Ulysses documents the day in the life of a man from Dublin on the date 16 June 1904. It is split into 18 episodes. There’s not much else I can say about this plot (if you think I’ve missed anything, comment below, remember that I have not read this book).

I don’t know if I would want to read this book as I haven’t met anyone who has read and enjoyed it. But I do feel it is one that I SHOULD read, rather than want to. No matter if I like it or not, it will be an experience.


What other books do you think people should read at least once in their lifetime? Comment below.

Gracexxx

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: T

Hello Everyone,


T is for Trumpet today. This was one of the first books I read after moving to the ‘deen for university as part of my course work, and I was just blown away by it. I think I read it in about 3 hours (the first time) which although I am a VERY fast reader, is still kinda fast for my course reading (normally about a day max). The story just pulled me in, and I had a compulsive need to finish it, and not put it down.

It is about a famous trumpet player called Joss Moody who, on his death, is revealed to be a woman. This is highly controversial as he had married a woman, and they had adopted a child. The entire world believed he was a man. Joss Moody dressed and talked and walked exactly like a man. The book chronicles different characters’ reactions to Moody’s revelation, and how they are coping in their grief. These include his wife Millie, and his son Colman.
via: http://bucketofmogs.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/tumblr_m5t1retqlw1r4msey.jpg


This book covers some pretty hard hitting themes of gender roles, and what exactly gender is. Gender is a performance, it is something you do for society to make yourself ‘normal’. Women put on dresses and lipstick, and men shave (or not) and wear suits. I am being simplistic and stereotypical, but the concept remains the same. We do things in order to perform for society. And if people do not conform to that stereotype, then they are ostracized and shunned. Even in today’s society which is more liberal than in past generations, would find it shocking to not conform to society (even when conforming is rebelling against, those who do not are considered odd).
Jackie Kay: the author
via: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Bj9O5HkEPn8/TWTQhPfaXBI/AAAAAAAAA2U/dMz-E90DyEc/s400/jackie_kay.jpg


Joss loved Millie. Millie loved Joss. She grieved when he was gone. No matter what choices he made, to be a man, or a woman, she loved him. This is the true essence of Trumpet, love. Even if it was unconventional, or weird, or even ‘unnatural’ as some would say, both Millie and Joss found true love in one another. This is the most poignant point of the novel, the love between these two people. 


Jackie Kay, the author, said in an interview that she wanted to write a piece of literature that was like a piece of music, which I believe is true. Millie's narrative is like the base beat to Joss' life. Colman's harmony starts off angry, and then calms out to a mild acceptance. Every chapter adds a new harmony to the symphony of Joss Moody's life. 

Have you read any books that you just were not able to put down? Comment below.

Gracexxx



Tuesday, 22 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: S

Hello Everyone,


The letter of the day is S. So of course it makes sense to pay homage to one of the most, if not the most, successful literary characters of all time: Sherlock Holmes. Who is he? Elementary, my dear Watson (although you hard core Sherlockians may know that Sherlock never actually said that line in the books). He is the world’s first, and only consulting detective. There have been various incarnations of the famous detective over the years in TV shows, films, even spin off books. However, none of them can touch the original (although some come pretty darn close).
via: http://www.sherlock-holmes.com/Jerry%20Faces%2011_10_2005_nonames.jpg


It might be good to explain the context that Sherlock Holmes first appeared on the literary radar. After a lot of criminal novels where crime was glamourized, and to be a criminal was pretty cool. However, with the rise in urban crime, it became feared, and so the police became respected. Novels about detectives solving crimes were popular. And from this Sherlock Holmes was born. He was like nothing else out there. He worked with the police, so was good, but he wasn’t the police so wasn’t restricted to their rules. He could play criminals at their own game. And he was better. It is for this reason and this reason only that Sherlock Homes still exists today.
via: http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/9700000/Sherlock-Holmes-sherlock-holmes-2009-film-9773081-1280-1024.jpg


For a book that was written in the 18th century, it has aged well. Perhaps it is because of the timelessness of Holmes himself, although the books span over many years, Holmes does not seem to get old or slow down. Or it could be that it is set in the heart of London, which has not changed too much. Or even Watson, whose narrative style does not change, nor his feelings about Holmes.
via: http://d1lalstwiwz2br.cloudfront.net/images_users/tiny_mce/Sutirtha11/php1DV8jB.jpeg



The various reincarnations of Holmes are very popular, with my favourites being the Hollywood blockbuster with Robert Downey Jnr (so cool) and the BBC’s Sherlock with Benedict Cumberbatch (the best high functioning sociopath on the telly). Why do they remain so popular? Because they are based on the best detective novels of all time. There is no end to the number of stories to be told about Sherlock Holmes, and every generation will see him slightly differently from the last. This evolution will keep Sherlock Holmes alive, at least in the literary sense.
via: http://www.universityexpress.co.in/delhiuniversity/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/sherlock-benedict-cumberbatch.jpg


What is your favourite Sherlock Holmes? Which one of his stories do you just love? Comment below telling me.

Gracexxx

Monday, 21 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: R

Hello Everyone,


Today’s letter is R, and so my book is Robinson Crusoe.
via: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/Robinson_Crusoe_and_Man_Friday_Offterdinger.jpg


It is a discovery and survival novel. Robinson Crusoe sets out on a voyage against the wishes of his parents, but the ship gets caught in a storm and he ends up wrecked on an island with only the pets from the ship on board. He saves a few tools, and then just has to survive on his own wits. He is stuck there for a couple of years before he meets some cannibals who come to eat the people stranded on the island. He fights them off but saves a man he dub ‘Friday’ due to the day he met him on. Robinson converts Friday to Christianity. When the cannibals return, they attack and save only two men, Friday’s father and a Spaniard who would be able to get Robinson home. With a little trouble from some pirates, Robinson finally gets back to England with Friday.
via: http://niclikesausten.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/robinson_crusoe.jpg


Robinson Crusoe asks the questions of what would you do to survive. It also gets you to question your faith, and what you believe in. How much do you have to be put through to prove your faith is strong enough? This is the key question that the book will raise for you, what do you believe in to get you through? God, fate, luck, yourself. It doesn’t really matter ultimately. As long as you have faith in something, you will always have hope of survival.
via: http://www.corpussomnium.org/wp-content/gallery/robinson-crusoe/robinson-crusoe-man-friday.jpg


If you were stuck on a desert island, what three things would you take? Comment explaining what you would take, and why (you cannot take people, only objects).


Gracexxx

Saturday, 19 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: Q

Hello Everyone,


Today’s letter is Q, and as you can guess, I spent quite a lot of time trying to think of a book beginning with Q (I don’t think I’ve read any!) Anyway, I decided to quiz my family to see if they could think of any, and my Dad suggested QB VII.
via: http://mla-s1-p.mlstatic.com/qb-vii-estuche-con-2-videos-ben-gazzara-leslie-caron-vhs-4023-MLA118651961_459-F.jpg


QB VII is about a legal case between two people that reached the Queen’s Bench (hence the name. For those of you who don’t know, this is a legal citation reference, where QB stands for Queen’s Bench) The first part of the book tells the stories of the plaintiff (the person who’s brought the case to court) and the defendant (the person who the case is against) to explain their pasts. The plaintiff’s name is Adam Kelno, and he was a doctor who was pressed into helping the Nazis at the concentration camps. He was able to help lots of people escape the gas chambers. When he decides to go back to normal practice, he is accused of helping the Nazis perform horrible experiments. When his past comes out, he is not able to defend himself. The defendant is a writer who has published a book about survivors from the concentration camp who cite Dr Kelno as being the cause of their suffering. He writes a line in the book citing “fifteen thousand” as subject to surgery without anaesthesia, for which he and the publishing house are sued for libel by Adam Kelno. The book documents the case from beginning to end, and is definitely on my reading wish-list.
via: http://crslatnick.com/images/55184f.jpg


The book highlights the legal system’s flaws, and the idea that nobody can really win. The defendant says before the trial starts: ‘Nobody’s going to win this trial; we’re all losers.’ He understands that although people want to believe they could resist the pressure from a concentration camp, not everyone can, and that this seems to be the main problem with his crime, that he had a choice.

I really want to read this book because it appeals to my legal studies side, this is a case I can completely get into. And as an English student, I am interested in how well it is portrayed, and how accurately too.

Can you think of any other books like this? How well do they deal with the issues highlighted by the case they are describing? Comment below letting me know.


Gracexxx

Friday, 18 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: P



Hello Everyone,


Today is Five on Friday (hosted by the fabulous girls AprilDarciChristina and Natasha) and the letter is P. On with the show!
THE GOOD LIFE BLOG

Percy Jackson
I have already told you about my love of Percy Jackson. The characters are great, and I love the new series, Heroes of Olympus. The plot is more complex, with quite difficult relationships between the young characters. Friendships, relationships are studied, and are one of the most important aspects of the series, how the kids interact with one another.
via: http://emilykazakh.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/percy-annabeth-and-grover-percy-jackson-and-the-olympians-10507066-2560-1600.jpg


                The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie tells the story of a teacher who has a strange amount of control over her pupils’ lives after she has finished teaching them. She attempts to play God, and make the girls in her image, to inspire them to do more than most girls aspire to, but she fails in this attempt because she over-reaches herself, and doesn’t seem to know what they should aspire to do. Even when they reach the highest they can get in their field she is disappointed.
via: http://riversihaveknown.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/the-prime-of-miss-jean-brodie-movie-poster.jpg

                The Princess Diaries
A shy Manhatten teenager finds out she’s secretly a Princess. Hilarity ensues. With every aspect of her life now under scrutiny from the press, the public, and her grandmother, Mia Thermopolis-Renaldi learns to run a country, be a princess, and how to follow her heart. Perfect for pre-teen girls (and some older teenagers too!)
via: http://screencrave.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/the-princess-diaries-makeover-sequence-la-4-25-12.jpg

                Power of Five
I love Antony Horowitz. The first one of his books that I read was a second hand copy from my cousin of The Falcon’s Malteser, and there was no stopping me from devouring every single of his books that I came across. I really liked the Alex Rider series, but I loved the Power of Five series. The plot lines were fabulous, and I had to wait so long for the last instalment, which kept me keen (check out my previous post on it). The characters were fab, and I loved the conclusion. There is one thing that Antony Horowitz does well is concluding a series. You are never disappointed with them, and you couldn’t predict them, which I love.
via: https://lh6.ggpht.com/XGfhhOGqMjC_o_9vW6KJZ8W6mEtgweZHSGhk6-aYGZdlJCoUziA3h_9ymnsOAY4pOA=w300

                Pride and Prejudice
What can you say about the classic romance novel? Beautifully written, tragic characters, good story. Enough said. I really enjoyed reading it, and would like to again sometime.
via: http://www.rachelcoker.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Pride-and-Prejudice.jpg

Gracexxx


Thursday, 17 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: O

Hello Everyone,


Oliver Twist is the classic Dickens novel. In fact, it’s the classic orphan novel. I read this while travelling down to England in the car during the summer holidays one year, and I really enjoyed it.
via: http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/11/07/article-1083887-0265C7C9000005DC-289_468x328.jpg


In case you don’t know the story, here’s the simple version.  An orphan boy named Oliver is in the workhouse, and asks for some more food. As a result he is sold to work at an under-taker’s. After a period there where he is mistreated and beaten, he runs away to London. Upon arriving in London, he is picked up by a boy who is revealed to be The Artful Dodger. Oliver follows him to his hideaway, and meets Fagin, the leader of a group of pick-pockets. He goes to pickpocket with the boys, but gets caught by the police for taking a gentleman called  Mr Brownlow’s handkerchief. However, Oliver was cleared of the crime, as it was Dodger who stole the handkerchief, and he is taken home with Mr Brownlow. However, he is not allowed to stay with Mr Brownlow for long, as Fagin is worried that he might have snitched about the gang, he sends Nancy and Bill Sykes to check on Oliver and bring him back. He is then forced to take part in a burglary with Bill Sykes, which goes wrong. Oliver then ends up being looked after by the people he was supposed to rob, Miss Rose and her guardian Mrs. Maylie. A man named Monks plots with Fagin to ruin Oliver, where he plots to throw some valuables of Oliver’s mother into the river. However, this is scrapped as Nancy has listened into their conversation, and tells Mrs. Maylie and Rose. She tries to stop the plot to hurt Oliver, but is discovered, and Sykes beats her to death. However, he is plagued with visions of Nancy as a ghost, and accidently hangs himself. Monk is revealed to be Oliver’s half paternal brother, where Oliver is illegitimate and loved, he is legitimate, but loveless. Mr Brownlow tells Oliver to give Monks half his inheritance to give him a second chance. Fagin and Monk both die in prison eventually. Mrs. Maylie turns out to be Oliver’s aunt, and Oliver stays with Mr Brownlow. (Yes, this is the SIMPLE version!)
via: http://www.editoreric.com/greatlit/moviepics/OliverTwist1968wide.jpg


It’s a beautiful tale of rags to riches, but it has a darker edge to it. There are numerous points in the novel where crime, prostitution, rape and extreme poverty are abundant. In fact, most of the book is like that. It really shows off the difference between the classes in Victorian London, and what poorness drives people to do. Perhaps not the most appropriate subject matter for a 11/12 year old, but whatever. I really enjoyed reading it, and I do recommend it to anyone’s reading list.

What other rags to riches stories can you name? Comment below.


Gracexxx

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

A-Z Challenge: N

Hello Everyone,


This is a special post for me as it is my birthday! (Happy Birthday to me, happy birthday to me…) Luckily for me, it fell on day N, and I am nineteen years old.

Nineteen years ago today, I was born (duh, that’s what birthdays are!), and in my nineteen years I have read a lot of books. So today I am going to share my bookish memories with you guys (to keep with my book theme).
Image courtesy of Marlene Simoes


The first book I read
The first book I read is a difficult one, as I remember it slightly different to my parents. They reckon that the first book I read was Rosie and the Tortoise by Wild and Brooks. I think it was A Bug’s Life book of the movie. Also, what I did was probably not technically ‘reading’. I took it off whoever was reading it and ‘read’ it from memory (will point out at this moment that I was 3 years old at the time, so I hadn’t even learnt how to read properly yet!) Apparently I turned the pages at the right time and everything. I can’t remember what the first book I actually read was, because I read a lot of books with my mum when I had learnt to read. But the ones I remember are Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, the Hobbit and Stargirl.
Not me I'm afraid, all my childhood photos are actual photos, not scanned
via: http://www.flowergirlworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/girl_reading.jpg


The last book I finished
The last book I finished was yesterday, and it was Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. After writing my post on the series, I decided that I wanted to re-read the series.


The next book I plan to read
Well, it should be Giovanni’s Room, as it will be the book that we are studying next in my course. However, it will probably be Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, if I’m going to be honest. There’s not much else to say on that subject.
"'I'm wondering what to read next,' Matilda said. 'I've finished all the children's books.'"
via: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qSFei519jYk/T41BcCx6IcI/AAAAAAAAE7I/F2SnwBRn-fA/s400/Matilda.jpg

My favourite book
This is a difficult one, as I really just have whole piles of ‘favourite’ books (meaning that none of them are my favourite.) I really loved Journey to the Centre of the Earth (see my review here) as it completely captured my imagination, and I just loved it. Another book that I really loved was the Great Gatsby. However, I have slightly gone off it at the moment as I had to study it for Higher, and I just need a couple of months not thinking about it to allow me to fully appreciate it again. I just love the tragic hero of Gatsby, and his love of Daisy: his unattainable dream. There is just something that speaks to me, and that I completely understand and empathise with. I don’t know exactly what.
via: http://media1.onsugar.com/files/2013/05/03/842/n/3019466/44721c4b88300d88_2006.xxxlarge/i/How-whimsical-2006-Great-Gatsby-book-cover.jpg


My least favourite book
I don’t know if I have a least favourite book. I’m not sure if I’ve really disliked a book. One book that I remember not enjoying was Looking for Alaska by John Green. I don’t know why I disliked it, I just didn’t like the characters, and thought they were all despicable. I just couldn’t sympathise with their situation, and what happened to them. Another one that I really disliked reading was Utopia by Sir Thomas More. There was no story or characters to follow, and I just didn’t believe that the society he described could happen.
via: http://www.napsbitmesra.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/alaska.jpg


Most sought after book
At the moment my most sought after book is Heroes of Olympus House of Hades, as I had to go into three separate book shops on three separate occasions to find a copy of it. Then, when I finally find a copy of it, I find that it’s in hardback, and so very expensive. It also wouldn’t match my copies of the previous books in the series as they are paperback. So I still have not got a copy of it.
via: http://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1370008006l/12127810.jpg


Most anticipated release
Apart from the last Harry Potter, which was the most anticipated release the world has seen, I would say possibly that my most anticipated release may have to be Anthony Horowitz’s Power of Five  series: Book 5 Oblivion. I think I started reading it when I was 10 or 11, and the last book didn’t come out until last year. I can say, it safely lived up to my expectations. Another book that I really anticipated the release was the City of Ashes (what I believed to be the last in The Mortal Instruments series, but it wasn’t). It also lived up to my expectations. One anticipated release that did not live up to my expectations was the third book of the Divergent Trilogy, Allegiant. I don’t understand, I think it could have had a better conclusion, and reasoning behind the book. There were no clever little hidden things in the book that all added up to the conclusion, it was just stated the answer, and that was that. No hidden subtleties. This year’s anticipated release is City of Heavenly Fire: the sixth, and last, book in The Mortal Instruments series. I cannot wait, and I really hope it lives up to my expectations.
via: http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20140116020116/mortalinstruments/images/4/42/COHF_cover.jpg


Literary Hero
I have numerous literary heroes. JK Rowling, for hitting the lowest point in her life, and still finding inspiration to write. Anthony Horowitz, for creating some of the cleverest, and coolest characters ever. Roald Dhal, for getting me through my childhood, and teaching me that being silly is very important to life. F Scott Fitzgerald, for creating the most tragic of situations. Cassandra Clare, for allowing me to indulge my romantic and fantasy side. Jacqueline Wilson, for teaching me to always be myself.  Hard to sum up really, without anything really corny and trite. So I won’t bother. Except this.
via: http://meetville.com/images/quotes/Quotation-Louise-Penny-literary-world-heroes-Meetville-Quotes-475.jpg

Who is your literary hero, and why? They can be characters in a book (I decided that I couldn’t go down that road as I would never finish this post) or authors. Comment below letting me know. I’m off to eat some cake.

Gracexxx